Real Men Love Pink – A Collection of Quotes by A. W. Pink


Blessed are the poor in spirit
June 26, 2013, 5:28 PM
Filed under: Carnal, Deceived, Faith, Modern Pulpits, Pride, Sanctification, Spiritual Growth

““Blessed are the poor in spirit.” There is a vast difference between this and being hard up in our circumstances. There is no virtue (and often no disgrace) in financial poverty as such, nor does it, of itself, produce humility of heart, for anyone who has any real acquaintance with both classes soon discovers there is just as much pride in the indigent as there is in the opulent. This poverty of spirit is a fruit that grows on no merely natural tree. It is a spiritual grace wrought by the Holy Spirit in those whom He renews. By nature we are well pleased with ourselves, and mad enough to think that we deserve something good at the hands of God. Let men but conduct themselves decently in a civil way, keeping themselves from grosser sins, and they are rich in spirit, pride filling their hearts, and they are self-righteous. And nothing short of a miracle of grace can change the course of this stream.

Nor is real poverty of spirit to be found among the great majority of the religionists of the day: very much the reverse. How often we see advertised a conference for “promoting the higher life,” but who ever heard of one for furthering the lowly life? Many books are telling us how to be “filled with the Spirit,” but where can we find one setting forth what it means to be spiritually emptied—emptied of self-confidence, self-importance, and selfrighteousness? Alas, if it be true that,

“That which is highly esteemed among men is abomination in the sight of God” (Luke 16:15),

it is equally true that what is of great price in His sight is despised by men—by none more so than by modern Pharisees, who now hold nearly all the positions of prominence in Christendom. Almost all of the so-called “ministry” of this generation feeds pride, instead of starving the flesh; puffs up, rather than abases; and anything which is calculated to search and strip is frowned upon by the pulpit and is unpopular with the pew.

“Blessed are the poor in spirit.” And what is poverty of spirit? It is the opposite of that haughty, self-assertive and self-sufficient disposition which the world so much admires and praises. It is the very reverse of that independent and defiant attitude which refuses to bow to God, which determines to brave things out, which says with Pharaoh, “Who is the Lord that I should obey His voice?” To be “poor in spirit” is to realize that I have nothing, am nothing, and can do nothing, and have need of all things. Poverty of spirit is a consciousness of my emptiness, the result of the Spirit’s work within. It issues from the painful discovery that all my righteousnesses are as filthy rags. It follows the awakening that my best performances are unacceptable, yea, an abomination to the thrice Holy One. Poverty of spirit evidences itself by its bringing the individual into the dust before God, acknowledging his utter helplessness and deservingness of hell. It corresponds to the initial awakening of the prodigal in the far country, when he “began to be in want.”

God’s great salvation is free, “without money and without price.” This is a most merciful provision of Divine grace, for were God to offer salvation for sale no sinner could secure it, seeing that he has nothing with which he could possibly purchase it. But the vast majority are insensible of this, yea, all of us are until the Holy Spirit opens our sin-blinded eyes. It is only those who have passed from death unto life who become conscious of their poverty, take the place of beggars, are glad to receive Divine charity, and begin to seek the true riches. Thus “the poor have the Gospel preached to them” (Matthew 11:5): preached not only to their ears, but to their hearts!” —A. W. Pink (1886–1952)

Taken from “The Sermon on the Mount” by A. W. Pink (1886–1952)

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Downhill!
March 23, 2013, 5:50 PM
Filed under: Carnal, Ignorance, Sin, Total Depravity, Worldly

“For wide is the gate and broad is the way that leadeth to destruction, and many there be which go in thereat.” “In those words our Lord advanced a reason or argument to enforce His previous exhortation. There is another gate than the “strait” one, altogether different therefrom, for it is “wide” and gives entrance into a broad way, but it leads to the bottomless pit. It is “the course of this world” (Ephesians 2:2), in which all its unregenerate citizens are found. It is the path of self-will and selfgratification. It is “wide” because those in it own no restrictions. They have broken down the commandments of God which were designed to be a hedge about them. It is therefore a pleasant and easy way to the flesh, for no inquiry or diligent search has to be made in order to find it, no resolution and perseverance are called for in order to continue treading it, no self-denial has to be practiced to remain therein. A dead fish can float with the stream, but only a living one can swim against it: so the unregenerate mechanically follow this road, for there is nothing in them to resist the law of gravity. The going is smooth and easy because it is all downhill!” —A. W. Pink (1886–1952)

Taken from “The Sermon on the Mount” by A. W. Pink (1886–1952)

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The Final Word
March 3, 2013, 6:55 AM
Filed under: Carnal, Deceived, Exposition of The Gospel of John, True Conversion

“Here is the final word against those who decry godly obedience as “legalism.” The incarnate Son walked according to His Father’s commandments. He “pleased not himself” (Romans 15:3). His meat was to do the will of the One who had sent Him. And He has left us an example that we should follow His steps.

“He that saith he abideth in him ought himself also so to walk even
as he walked” (1 John 2:6).

The one who disregards God’s “commandments” is not walking as Christ walked; instead, he is walking as the world walks. Let no one heed the idle quibble that the “commandments” of Christ are opposed to or even different from the commandments of the Father. Christ and the Father are one — one in nature, one in character, one in authority.

“The commandments of Christ include the whole of the preceptive part of the inspired volume, with the exception of those ritual and political statutes which refer to the introductory dispensations which have passed away” (Dr. John Brown).

And let it be said again, that no Christian can abide in Christ’s love unless he is keeping Christ’s commandments!” —A. W. Pink (1886–1952)

Taken from “An Exposition of the Gospel of John” by A. W. Pink (1886-1952)

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Inseparably Connected
July 28, 2012, 11:15 AM
Filed under: Carnal, Pride, Worldly

“Inseparably connected with self-love is pride, and the fostering of pride is fatal to the cultivation of brotherly affection. The majority, if not all, of the petty grievances among Christians, are to be traced back to this evil root. “Love suffereth long,” but pride is terribly impatient. “Love envieth not,” but pride is intensely jealous. “Love seeketh not her own,” but pride ever desires gratification. “Love seeketh not her own,” but pride demands constant attention from others. “Love beareth all things,” but pride is resentful of the slightest injury. “Love endureth all things,” but pride is offended if a brother fails to greet him on the street. Pride must be mortified if brotherly love is to flourish.” —A. W. Pink (1886–1952)

Taken from “An Exposition of Hebrews” by A. W. Pink (1886-1952)

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Foot-washing?
February 20, 2012, 8:44 PM
Filed under: Carnal, Exposition of The Gospel of John, Ignorance, Uncategorized

“For I have given you an example, that ye should do as I have done to you” (John 13:15).

“It is well known that not a few have regarded this as a command from Christ for His followers now to practice literal foot-washing, yea, some have exalted it into a “Church ordinance.” While we cannot but respect and admire their desire to obey Christ, especially in a day when laxity and selfpleasing is so rife, yet we are fully satisfied that they have mistaken our Lord’s meaning here. Surely to insist upon literal foot-washing from this verse is to miss the meaning as well as the spirit of the whole passage. It is not with literal water (any more than the “water” is literal in John 3:5; 4:14; 7:38) that the Lord would have us wash one another. It is the Word (of which “water” is the emblem) He would have us apply to our fellow disciples’ walk. This should not need arguing, but for the benefit of those who think that the Lord here instituted an ordinance which He would have practiced today, we would ask them to please weigh carefully the following points:

That that which the Lord Jesus here did to His disciples looked beyond the literal act to its deep symbolic significance is clear from these facts:

First, the Lord’s word to Peter, “What I do thou knowest not now” (John 13:7): certainly Peter knew that his feet had been literally washed!

Second, the further words of Christ to Peter, “If I wash thee not, thou hast no part with me” (John 13:8): certainly there are multitudes of believers that have a part with Christ who have never practiced footwashing as a religious ordinance.

Third, His words, “Ye are clean, but not all” (John 13:10): Judas could never have been thus excepted if only literal foot-washing was here in view.

Fourth, His question, “Know ye what I have done to you?” clearly intimates that the Lord’s act in washing the feet of the disciples had a profound spiritual meaning.

Fifth, note that here in John 13:15 the Lord does not say “Ye should do what I have done unto you,” but “as I have done to you!” Add to these considerations the fact that this incident is found in John’s Gospel, which is, pre-eminently, the one which treats of spiritual relationships under various figures — bread, water, Shepherd and sheep, vine and the branches, etc., and surely all difficulty disappears.” —A. W. Pink (1886–1952)

Taken from “An Exposition of the Gospel of John” by A. W. Pink (1886-1952)

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Affairs of this World
January 21, 2012, 8:50 AM
Filed under: Carnal, Deceived, Politics, Spiritual Growth, Worldly

“One form of worldliness which has spoiled the life and testimony of many a Christian is politics. We will not now discuss the question whether or not the saint ought to take any interest in polities, but simply point out what should be evident to all with spiritual discernment, namely, that to take an eager and deep concern in politics must remove the edge from any spiritual appetite. Clearly, politics are concerned only with the affairs of this world, and therefore to become deeply absorbed in them and have the heart engaged in the pursuit thereof, will inevitably turn attention away from eternal things. Any worldly matter, no matter how lawful in itself, which engages our attention inordinately, becomes a snare and saps our spiritual vitality. We greatly fear that those saints who spent several hours a day in listening to the speeches of candidates, reading the newspapers on them, and discussing party politics with their fellows during the recent election, lost to a considerable extent their relish for the Bread of Life.” —A. W. Pink (1886–1952)

Taken from “Spiritual Growth” by A. W. Pink (1886-1952)

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Self-Murder
December 30, 2011, 6:43 AM
Filed under: Carnal, Deceived, Sin, Total Depravity

“Suicide is self-murder, and is one of the most desperate crimes which can be committed. Inasmuch as this sin precludes repentance on the part of its perpetrator, it is beyond forgiveness. Such creatures are so abandoned by God as to have no concern for their eternal salvation, seeing they pass into the immediate presence of their Judge with their hands imbrued in their own blood. Such are self-murderers, for they destroy not only their bodies but their souls, too.” —A. W. Pink (1886–1952)

Taken from “The Ten Commandments” by A. W. Pink (1886-1952)

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The People’s Church
December 17, 2011, 7:59 AM
Filed under: Carnal, Deceived, False Believers, Ignorance, Worldly

“We turn now to consider at a little more length the seventh Epistle, addressed to the church of the Laodiceans (Revelation 3:14-22). This Epistle portrays the last state of the professing church on earth, a state characterized by high pretentions and self-sufficiency, but so utterly nauseous to Christ that He declares “I know thy works, that thou art neither cold nor hot: I would that thou wert cold or hot. So then because thou art lukewarm, I will spue thee out of My mouth” (vs. 15, 16).

The word Laodicea means “the rule of the laity or people.” It is the people’s church, not Christ’s, for notice He is outside (vs. 20), standing and knocking for admission. Its condition is described as “lukewarm:” it is neither one thing nor the other, partly hot and partly cold. How accurately this describes the present day condition of the professing church! A condition of mixture — mixed up with the world, claiming to be heavenly and yet clinging to everything that is earthly; bearing the name of Christ and yet misrepresenting Him and putting Him to an open shame. Much religion but little life. Much activity but little vitality. Much doing but little accomplished. Much display but little power. Neither hot nor cold: neither out and out for God, nor out and out for the Devil. “Lukewarm,” as though hot and cold water had been poured into the same vessel. This is exactly what we have in the churches today — intense worldliness and wickedness veneered over with humanitarian and religious pretenses.

Another characteristic of Laodicea is the spirit of boasting — “Thou sayest, I am rich, and increased with goods, and have need of nothing” (vs. 17). Loud and lofty are the pretentions of the professing church, but how shallow they really are! There is much ostentatious parading of resources, but it is an empty profession. There is self-conceit, showy attainments, architectural display, intellectual acquirements, influential numbers, but Christ is excluded! In this church (see the Epistle), unlike all the previous ones, there is nothing whatever in it that Christ commends — sad commentary upon its true condition! But this is merely negative: there is much in it that He condemns — “and knowest not that thou are wretched, and miserable, and poor, and blind, and naked” (vs. 17). The church is utterly ignorant of its actual and deplorable state. Its leaders are crying “Peace and safety” when “sudden destruction” is upon them (1 Thessalonians 5:3). Unspeakably sad is this. Whilever there is recognition of our condition and our need, there is hope, for recognition and acknowledgement of weakness is the secret of strength (2 Corinthians 12:9). But self-complacency is fatal. For self-righteousness there is no remedy. Though self-sufficient and self-righteous the professing church will shortly be “spued out” by the One whose name it bears.”—A. W. Pink (1886–1952)

Taken from “The Redeemer’s Return” by A. W. Pink  (1886–1952)

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Sad Index
December 15, 2011, 6:29 PM
Filed under: Carnal, Entertainment, Hymns

“So many hymns today (if “hymns” they deserve to be called) are full of maudlin sentimentality, instead of Divine adoration. They announce our love to God instead of His for us. They recount our experiences, instead of His mercies. They tell more of human attainments, instead of Christ’s Atonement. Sad index of our low state of spirituality!” —A. W. Pink (1886–1952)

Taken from “Gleanings in Exodus” by A. W. Pink (1886–1952)

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Blessed Doctrine
November 14, 2011, 9:02 PM
Filed under: Arminianism, Carnal, Deceived, Election, Ignorance, Sovereignty of God

“By such devilish efforts do the enemies of God seek to distort and destroy this blessed doctrine (of election). They besmirch it with mire, seek to overwhelm it with things odious, and present it to the indignant gaze of men as something to be repudiated and abominated. A monster of iniquity is thus created and christened “Election,” and then presented to the world as something to be cast out as evil. Thereby multitudes have been cheated out of one of the most precious portions of divine truth, and thereby some of God’s own people have been sorely perplexed and harassed. That the avowed opponents of Christ should revile a doctrine taught by Him and His apostles is only to be expected; but when those who profess to be His friends and followers join in denouncing this truth, it only serves to demonstrate the cunning of that old serpent the devil, who is never more pleased than when he can persuade nominal Christians to do his vile work for him. Then let not the reader be moved by such opposition.

The vast majority of these opposers have little or no real understanding of that which they set themselves against. They are largely ignorant of what the Scriptures teach thereon, and are too indolent to make any serious study of the subject. Whatever attention they do pay to it is mostly neutralized by the veil of prejudice which obstructs their vision. But when such persons examine the doctrine with sufficient diligence to discover that it leads only to holiness—holiness in heart and life—then they redouble their efforts to do away with it. When professing Christians unite with its detractors, charity obliges us to conclude that it is because of failure to properly understand the doctrine. They take a one-sided view of this truth: they view it through distorted lenses: they contemplate it from the wrong angle. They fail to see that election originated in everlasting love, that it is the choosing of a company to eternal salvation, who otherwise would have inevitably perished, and that it makes that company a willing, obedient, and holy people.” —A. W. Pink (1886–1952)

Taken from “The Doctrine of Election” by Arthur W. Pink (1886–1952)

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