Real Men Love Pink – A Collection of Quotes by A. W. Pink


Terrible Thing
July 17, 2012, 5:13 PM
Filed under: False Believers, False Teachers, Modern Pulpits

“The terrible thing is that so many preachers today, under the pretence of magnifying the grace of God, have represented Christ as the Minister of sin; as One who has, through His atoning sacrifice, procured an indulgence for men to continue gratifying their fleshly and worldly lusts. Provided a man professes to believe in the virgin birth and vicarious death of Christ, and claims to be resting upon Him alone for salvation, he may pass for a real Christian almost anywhere today, even though his daily life may be no different from that of the moral worldling who makes no profession at all. The Devil is chloroforming thousands into hell by this very delusion.” —A. W. Pink (1886–1952)

Taken from “Practical Christianity” by A. W. Pink (1886-1952)

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Self-Delusion
June 23, 2012, 6:12 AM
Filed under: Deceived, False Believers, Ignorance

“Self-love and self-esteem. This is as prolific and powerful a cause of self-deception as any of those mentioned above. Sinners compare themselves with their fellows and award themselves the first prize every time. He who is immoral regards himself as better than those who grind the poor and rob the widow. He who is a liar and a thief prides himself that he is no murderer. He who is outwardly religious deems himself vastly superior to the openly profane. Each one discovers some cause or other to say with the self-righteous Pharisee, “I thank God that I am not as this publican.” This is because they measure themselves by a wrong standard. Even a soiled handkerchief looks comparatively clean if it be placed on a miry road, but were it laid on newly fallen snow its uncleanness would soon be evident. So it is with those who are blind to their deplorable condition. But men are possessed with such a high estimate of themselves, and entertain such a good opinion of their souls’ condition, that even if they can be induced to measure themselves by the rule of God’s Word and examine their state they come to the work prepossessed, prejudiced in their own favor. Self-love will not suffer them to deal impartially with their souls.

When they read some condemnatory passage of Scripture they refuse to appropriate it: when they hear a particularly solemn and searching sermon they take it not home to themselves but apply it to some of their fellows. If they be awakened in some measure to the awfulness of sinning against God and alarmed at the fearful punishment reserved for such, this mood is only fitful and fleeting, for they quickly reassure themselves that no such guilt rests upon them. Sudden death may strike down some of their companions, but self-delusion blinds them to their own peril. A manifest judgment from God may fall upon their community, but they persuade themselves that they are in no danger of the wrath to come. The fact is that there are very few indeed who abandon all hope, give way to utter despair and conclude they will experience the everlasting burnings, and yet there is only a very little company who will escape them. The multitudes continue defying God, sinning with a high hand, and go on walking along the road which leads to the pit, and yet by one means or another each persuades himself he shall not enter there.

“For he flattereth himself in his own eyes, until his iniquity be found to be hateful” (Psalm 36:2).

Yes, the sinner “flattereth himself in his own eyes.” If he did not, he would be in terrible distress and anguish. He would not go on so cheerfully and gaily if he really believed himself in danger of hell. But he has too good an estimate of himself for that: he does not think he has ever done anything worthy of such a doom, he is sure he is not bad enough for such a place.

Men flatter themselves that they do not live in vice, but are decent citizens and good neighbors. They can see no reason why God should be angry with them. They do not take His name in vain nor scoff at religion. Yea, they flatter themselves that they have done much to commend themselves to Him and obtain His approbation. They read their Bibles occasionally and say their prayers. They attend church and contribute to its upkeep. They send their children to the Sabbath school. They resolve that later on they will be even better, out and out for Christ. but meanwhile they want to enjoy the world a little longer, “trust in themselves that they are righteous” (Luke 18:9) and are comparatively clean in their own sight, and yet they are not washed from their filthiness (Proverbs 30:12).” —A. W. Pink (1886–1952)

Taken from “The Sermon on the Mount” by A. W. Pink (1886–1952)

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Judge Righteous Judgement
February 10, 2012, 5:12 PM
Filed under: False Believers, Grace, Judgement, Spiritual Growth

“Judge not according to the appearance, but judge righteous judgment” (John 7:24).

“Is not this a word which is much needed today by both writer and reader? There is a twofold danger to be guarded against. First, to form too favorable a judgment of people, particularly of those who profess to be Christians. Words are cheap, and gushiness is never a mark of reality. That a man calls himself a Christian, and sincerely thinks himself to be so, does not make him one. The fact that he is a great reader of the Bible, a regular attender of religious services, and is sound in his morals, is no proof that he has been born again. “Lay hands suddenly on no man” (1 Timothy 5:22): look for the marks of regeneration and be satisfied you have found them, before you address any one as a Brother or Sister in Christ. It is our own fault if we are imposed upon by wolves in sheep’s clothing.

On the other hand, there is just as real a danger of forming too harsh a judgment of people, and imputing to hypocrisy what is genuine. A man is not to be made an offender for a word, nor does he deserve to be snubbed because he fails to fawn upon and flatter you. We must not expect everyone to pronounce our shibboleths or see eye to eye with us in everything. A kindly heart often beats beneath a gruff exterior. A babbling brook is very shallow, but still waters run deep. Not all are endowed with five talents. Others may not have had the same opportunities and privileges you have enjoyed. Let not a single action alienate a friend: bear in mind the general tenor of his conduct towards you. Be as ready to forgive as you desire to be forgiven. Remember there is still much in you which grates upon others. When wronged pray over it before you pass a verdict. Many a person has afterwards bitterly regretted a hasty decision. Take all the circumstances into account and “judge not according to the appearance, but judge righteous judgment.” —A. W. Pink (1886–1952)

Taken from “The Life of David, Volume 2” by A. W. Pink (1886-1952)

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The People’s Church
December 17, 2011, 7:59 AM
Filed under: Carnal, Deceived, False Believers, Ignorance, Worldly

“We turn now to consider at a little more length the seventh Epistle, addressed to the church of the Laodiceans (Revelation 3:14-22). This Epistle portrays the last state of the professing church on earth, a state characterized by high pretentions and self-sufficiency, but so utterly nauseous to Christ that He declares “I know thy works, that thou art neither cold nor hot: I would that thou wert cold or hot. So then because thou art lukewarm, I will spue thee out of My mouth” (vs. 15, 16).

The word Laodicea means “the rule of the laity or people.” It is the people’s church, not Christ’s, for notice He is outside (vs. 20), standing and knocking for admission. Its condition is described as “lukewarm:” it is neither one thing nor the other, partly hot and partly cold. How accurately this describes the present day condition of the professing church! A condition of mixture — mixed up with the world, claiming to be heavenly and yet clinging to everything that is earthly; bearing the name of Christ and yet misrepresenting Him and putting Him to an open shame. Much religion but little life. Much activity but little vitality. Much doing but little accomplished. Much display but little power. Neither hot nor cold: neither out and out for God, nor out and out for the Devil. “Lukewarm,” as though hot and cold water had been poured into the same vessel. This is exactly what we have in the churches today — intense worldliness and wickedness veneered over with humanitarian and religious pretenses.

Another characteristic of Laodicea is the spirit of boasting — “Thou sayest, I am rich, and increased with goods, and have need of nothing” (vs. 17). Loud and lofty are the pretentions of the professing church, but how shallow they really are! There is much ostentatious parading of resources, but it is an empty profession. There is self-conceit, showy attainments, architectural display, intellectual acquirements, influential numbers, but Christ is excluded! In this church (see the Epistle), unlike all the previous ones, there is nothing whatever in it that Christ commends — sad commentary upon its true condition! But this is merely negative: there is much in it that He condemns — “and knowest not that thou are wretched, and miserable, and poor, and blind, and naked” (vs. 17). The church is utterly ignorant of its actual and deplorable state. Its leaders are crying “Peace and safety” when “sudden destruction” is upon them (1 Thessalonians 5:3). Unspeakably sad is this. Whilever there is recognition of our condition and our need, there is hope, for recognition and acknowledgement of weakness is the secret of strength (2 Corinthians 12:9). But self-complacency is fatal. For self-righteousness there is no remedy. Though self-sufficient and self-righteous the professing church will shortly be “spued out” by the One whose name it bears.”—A. W. Pink (1886–1952)

Taken from “The Redeemer’s Return” by A. W. Pink  (1886–1952)

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Why?
November 9, 2011, 7:54 PM
Filed under: Carnal, Deceived, False Believers, Ignorance, Sin, Spiritual Growth

“Why is it that so many professing Christians change their view so easily and quickly? What is the reason there are so many thousands of unstable souls who are “tossed to and fro, and carried about with every wind of doctrine, by the sleight of men, and cunning craftiness, whereby they lie in wait to deceive” (Ephesians 4:14)? Why is it that this year they sit under a man who preaches the Truth and claim to believe and enjoy his messages; while next year they attend the ministry of a man of error and heartily embrace his opinions? It must be because they were never taught of the Spirit.” —A. W. Pink (1886–1952)

Taken from “The Holy Spirit” by A. W. Pink (1886–1952)

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Nominal Christians
October 31, 2011, 4:08 PM
Filed under: Deceived, False Believers, Ignorance, Modern Pulpits, Spiritual Growth

“Never were there so many millions of nominal Christians on earth as there are today, and never was there such a small percentage of real ones. Not since before the days of Luther and Calvin, when the great Reformation effected such a grand change for the better, has Christendom been so crowded with those who have “a form of godliness” but who are strangers to its transforming power. We seriously doubt whether there has ever been a time in the history of this Christian era when there were such multitudes of deceived souls within the churches, who verily believe that all is well with their souls when in fact the wrath of God abideth on them.”—A. W. Pink (1886–1952)

Taken from “The Sermon on the Mount” by A. W. Pink (1886–1952)

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Fire Escape?

“A preacher may induce a man to believe what Scripture says about his lost condition, persuade him to bow to the divine verdict, and then accept Christ as his personal Savior. No man wants to go to hell, and fire is assured intellectually that Christ stands ready as a fire escape, on the sole condition that he jump into His arms (“rest on His finished work”), thousands will do so. But a hundred preachers are unable to make an unregenerate person realize the dreadful nature of sin, or show him that he has been a lifelong rebel against God, or change his heart so that he now hates himself and longs to please God and serve Christ. Only the Spirit can bring man to the place where he is willing to forsake every idol, cut off a hindering right hand or pluck out an offending right eye.”  —A. W. Pink (1886–1952)

Taken from “Gleanings in the Godhead” by A. W. Pink (1886-1952)

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