Real Men Love Pink – A Collection of Quotes by A. W. Pink


Wretched Additions
September 17, 2014, 4:44 AM
Filed under: Gleanings In Genesis, Grace, Legalism

“Finally, we are told,

“And Jacob vowed a vow, saying, If God will be with me, and will keep me in this way that I go, and will give me bread to eat, and raiment to put on, so that I come again to my father’s house in peace; then shall the Lord be my God. And this stone, which I have set for a pillar, shall be God’s house, and of all that Thou shalt give me I will surely give the tenth unto Thee” (Genesis 28:20-22).

How true to life this is! It was not only characteristic of Jacob personally, but typical of us representatively. Jacob failed to rise to the level of God’s grace and was filled with fear instead of peace, and expressed human legality by speaking of what he will do. Oh, how often we follow in his steps! Instead of resting in the goodness of God and appropriating His free grace, like Jacob, we bargain and enter into conditions and stipulations. May the God of Grace enlarge our hearts to receive His grace, and may He empower us to magnify His grace by refusing to defile it with any of our own wretched additions.” —A. W. Pink (1886–1952)

Excerpt taken from “Gleanings In Genesis” by A. W. Pink (1886–1952)

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Poor In Spirit
November 19, 2013, 8:08 PM
Filed under: Grace, Pride, Sanctification, Spiritual Growth, True Conversion

“Blessed are the poor in spirit.” What is poverty of spirit? It is the opposite of that haughty, self-assertive, and self-sufficient disposition that the world so much admires and praises. It is the very reverse of that independent and defiant attitude that refuses to bow to God, that determines to brave things out, and that says with Pharaoh,

“Who is the Lord, that I should obey His voice?” (Exodus 5:2).

To be poor in spirit is to realize that I have nothing, am nothing, and can do nothing, and have need of all things. Poverty of spirit is evident in a person when he is brought into the dust before God to acknowledge his utter helplessness. It is the first experiential evidence of a Divine work of grace within the soul, and corresponds to the initial awakening of the prodigal in the far country when he “began to be in want” (Luke 15:14).  —A. W. Pink (1886–1952)

Taken from “The Beatitudes” by A. W. Pink (1886–1952)

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Love To God
July 15, 2013, 7:34 PM
Filed under: Grace, Love, Sanctification, Spiritual Growth

“Though all the regenerate have love to God, not all of them are equally aware of the fact, nor are all Christians sensible of it in the same way at all times. But a personal persuasion of our love to God is most desirable. Those things which the more deeply concern us ought the more seriously to affect us. None should deny its existence simply because they are dissatisfied with the degree or intensity of their love. God is indeed to be loved above everyone and everything else, and loved with all our being and strength, yet the best of His people sadly fail to render unto Him that which is His due. To find the heart going out more to a near relative than to God, or to grieve more over some temporal loss than for an offence against the Lord, must occasion great concern to a conscientious soul. Nevertheless, such an experience is not, of itself, a proof that we have no love to God, especially if devotedness to our kith and kin does not cause us to neglect Him.

Love to God is not to be determined by its elevation. Some writers have insisted that naught but disinterested love is worthy of the name—that God must be loved for what He is, and our neighbour as His creature. But there is a love of gratitude as well as of complacency, which makes a thankful return unto Him for His great love in Christ. This is expressly stated in 1 John 4:19, “We love him, because he first loved us.” Not only did God’s love precede ours, being set upon us when we were entirely loveless, but it is the cause of ours. Not only as the divine power created it in us, but as the motive which we are conscious of in our love. If our hearts had never been deeply affected by that transcendent love which moved God to give His own Son to die for such hell-deserving wretches as we know ourselves to be, should we have ever had any affection unto Him? No, indeed. Nor is there anything “legalistic” in this, if David hesitated not to leave it on record, “I love the LORD, because he hath heard my voice and my supplications” (Psa 96:1). I need not be ashamed to own that I love Him because He heard my cry for mercy and washed my sins away by the blood of the Lamb.

Love to God is not to be measured so much by its sensible stirrings or lively acts as by its solid esteem and settled constitution. Some Christians are naturally more emotional and lively, and therefore more easily stirred. Nor is love to be gauged by our feelings, but determined by our purpose of heart and sincere endeavours to please God. Partly because the act may be more lively where the affection be less firm in the heart. The passions of suitors are greater than the love of husbands, yet not so deeply rooted, nor do they so intimately affect the heart. Straw is soon enkindled, and its heat quickly spent, but coals burn longer and more constantly. And partly because the objects of sense do more affect and urge us in the present state. While the flesh remains in the believer, he will be more sensibly stirred by the things which agree with his carnal nature.” —A. W. Pink (1886–1952)

Taken from “Studies in the Scriptures” April 1951 edition by A. W. Pink (1886-1952)

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God’s Love To Us

“Let us now look more distinctly at some of the operations of God’s love. First, in election, “We are bound to give thanks always to God for you, brethren beloved of the Lord, because God hath from the beginning chosen you to salvation through sanctification of the Spirit [His quickening] and belief of the truth” (1 Thes 2:13). There is an infallible connection between God’s love and His selection of those who were to be saved. That election is the consequence of His love is clear again from Deuteronomy 7:7: “The LORD did not set his love upon you, nor choose you, because ye were more in number than any people.” So again in Ephesians 1:4-5: “In love: having predestinated us into the adoption of children by Jesus Christ to himself, according to the good pleasure of his will.” Second, in redeeming them. As we have seen above from 1 John 4:10, out of His sovereign love, God made provision of Christ to render satisfaction for their sins, though prior to their conversion, he was angry with them in respect of His violated Law, and provoked holiness by their transgressions. And “how shall he not with him also freely give us all things?” (Rom 8:32)—another clear proof that His Son was not “delivered up” to the cross for all mankind, for He gives them neither the Holy Spirit, a new nature, nor repentance and faith.

Third, effectual calling. From the enthroned Saviour, the Father sends forth the Holy Spirit (Act 2:33). Having loved His elect with an everlasting love, therefore with lovingkindness does He draw them (Jer 31:3), quickening into newness of life, calling them out of darkness into His marvelous light, making them manifestatively His children, “Behold, what manner of love the Father hath bestowed upon us, that we should be called the sons of God” (1 John 3:1). If filiation does not issue from God’s love as a sure effect thereof, to what purpose are those words? Fourth, healing their backslidings: “I will heal their backsliding, I will love them freely” (Hos 14:4)—without reluctance or hesitation. “Many waters cannot quench love, neither can the floods drown it” (Song 8:7). Such is God’s love unto His people—invincible, unquenchable. Not only is there no possibility of its expiring of itself, but the black waters of their backslidings cannot extinguish it, nor the floods of their unbelief put it out.

“Love is strong as death” (Song 8:6). Nothing more irresistible than death in the natural world, nothing so invincible as the love of God in the realm of grace.” —A. W. Pink (1886–1952)

Taken from “Studies in the Scriptures” March 1951 edition by A. W. Pink (1886-1952)

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Healthy Christianity
March 23, 2013, 5:42 PM
Filed under: Gospel, Grace, Law, Modern Pulpits, Sanctification, Spiritual Growth

“Healthy Christianity can only be maintained where the balance is properly preserved between a faithful exposition of the holy Law of God and a pressing of its claims upon the conscience, and by tenderly preaching the Gospel and applying its balm to stricken hearts. Where the former predominates to the virtual exclusion of the latter, self-righteous pharisaism is fostered; and where the proclamation of the Gospel ousts the requirements of the Law, Antinomian licentiousness is engendered. During the past hundred years Christendom has probably heard fifty Gospel sermons or addresses to one on the Law, and the consequence has indeed been disastrous and deplorable: a light and backboneless religion, with loose and careless walking.” —A. W. Pink (1886–1952)

Taken from “The Sermon on the Mount” by A. W. Pink (1886–1952)

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Ultimate Destination
March 18, 2013, 4:39 PM
Filed under: Grace, Sovereignty of God

“The ultimate destiny of every individual is decided by the will of God, and blessed it is that such be the case; if it were left to our wills, the ultimate destination of us all would be the lake of fire.”  —A. W. Pink (1886–1952)

Taken from “The Sovereignty of God” by A. W. Pink (1886-1952

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The Dispensation of Grace
October 2, 2012, 6:21 PM
Filed under: Grace, Works

“This is the Dispensation of Grace, and grace obliterates all distinctions, grace eliminates all questions of merits; grace makes every blessing a Divine and free gift. But, the human heart is essentially legalistic. Man wishes to have a hand in his own salvation and desires to contribute something to the price of his redemption. When, by grace, the Holy Spirit has taught a soul that the Finished Work of Christ is the sole ground of our justification before God, when he has learnt from the Scripture of Truth that the Blood of the Cross cannot be plussed by anything from the creature, then it is that the Enemy comes to that heart and seeks to disturb its peace and rob it of the liberty wherewith it has been made free, by insisting that faith in Christ merely puts us in a salvable condition, that believing the Gospel simply places us on an extended probation, and that only if we obey God’s commands and walk worthily before Him shall we be taken to Heaven at the close of our earthly pilgrimage. This is Law mingled with Grace; thus is the precious Blood supplemented by human works. Instead of realizing that good works flow from a heart that is filled with gratitude to God and which are constrained by the love of Christ, the believer is led to believe that good works must be performed by him as a condition of his eternal salvation. But, even when the believer has been delivered from this error, the legalistic tendency of the human heart still seeks an outlet”. —A. W. Pink (1886–1952)

Taken from “The Redeemer’s Return” by A. W. Pink  (1886–1952)

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